About us

Salisbury Arts Centre Exterior
  • Salisbury Arts Centre was formerly St Edmund’s Church, named after St Edmund who taught “the arts” at Oxford in the early 13th Century
  • By 1407 the original church was too small for its congregation and was replaced
  • In the early 1600s, at the height of Puritanism, scandal occurred when the Recorder of Salisbury, Henry Sherfield, attacked one of the stained glass windows with a pikestaff and was imprisoned!
  • In 1653 the tower collapsed and demolished the greater part of the church, leading to an extended period of conservation work stretching from the 17thto 20thCentury
  • St Edmund's was one of only two church buildings in the country to be granted permission to undertake construction during the Cromwellian period.
  • During the 1970s the church congregation numbers dropped and it was agreed that the congregation should be merged with the neighbouring St Thomas' Parish
  • In 1975 a covenant was drawn up that gave the building to Salisbury District Council for social, educational and   recreational activities
  • Salisbury Arts Centre was founded in 1975 and, from small beginnings, developed into a fully-fledged community arts centre
  • In the early 1990s funding reached crisis point and for over a year the arts centre was run by volunteers, while the people of Salisbury took to the streets with a ‘Save Our Arts Centre’ campaign
  • In 2003 Salisbury Arts Centre closed to the public to undergo a £4.2 million redevelopment, funded by Arts Council South West, English Heritage, Salisbury District Council, local people and businesses
  • In 2005 Salisbury Arts Centre reopened with a brand new programme of events and has continued to go from strength to strength

Read the full history of Salisbury Arts Centre >>>

  • Salisbury Arts Centre was formerly St Edmund’s Church, named after St Edmund who taught “the arts” at Oxford in the early 13th Century
  • By 1407 the original church was too small for its congregation and was replaced
  • In the early 1600s, at the height of Puritanism, scandal occurred when the Recorder of Salisbury, Henry Sherfield, attacked one of the stained glass windows with a pikestaff and was imprisoned!
  • In 1653 the tower collapsed and demolished the greater part of the church, leading to an extended period of conservation work stretching from the 17thto 20thCentury
  • St Edmund's was one of only two church buildings in the country to be granted permission to undertake construction during the Cromwellian period.
  • During the 1970s the church congregation numbers dropped and it was agreed that the congregation should be merged with the neighbouring St Thomas' Parish
  • In 1975 a covenant was drawn up that gave the building to Salisbury District Council for social, educational and   recreational activities
  • Salisbury Arts Centre was founded in 1975 and, from small beginnings, developed into a fully-fledged community arts centre
  • In the early 1990s funding reached crisis point and for over a year the arts centre was run by volunteers, while the people of Salisbury took to the streets with a ‘Save Our Arts Centre’ campaign
  • In 2003 Salisbury Arts Centre closed to the public to undergo a £4.2 million redevelopment, funded by Arts Council South West, English Heritage, Salisbury District Council, local people and businesses
  • In 2005 Salisbury Arts Centre reopened with a brand new programme of events and has continued to go from strength to strength
  • - See more at: http://www.salisburyartscentre.co.uk/venue/history.aspx#sthash.yeVkAo2l.dpuf