"Relentless, hilarious, brutal." Interview with the cast of 'Growth'

Growth cast
13 September 2017

 

 

We spoke to the cast of 'Growth' and here's what we found out.

 

DAFYDD THOMAS

DAFYDD THOMAS

What are you most excited about?  

I'm most excited about getting around the UK, and being able to share the piece with different audiences, and seeing how/if different audiences in different places react.

 

Who/what did you use as inspiration to get into the character?

I'm going to be playing quite a few characters, so for me, I spent a lot of time people watching. It's great to watch someone in the street, and try and figure out where they're from, and notice all the little differences that people have. I try and follow them for a bit, and copy their walk. Until they notice, and think I'm crazy.

 

If you were to convince a first time theatre goer to watch this show how would you describe it to them?

Its a show about normal people in normal situations. But it’s the little dominoes, that tipple over and change what could be an easy decision, into a difficult and funny one. It's dark, and funny. And not a stuffy old 4 hour Greek tragedy.

 

What have you learnt from this production and what you say to your younger self when it comes to broaching the subject of testicular cancer?

Know what's normal. It’s a taboo subject, but get to know your body. Know what is right. Time is key, even if you think it might not be a thing, get it checked. Our wonderful NHS staff will look after you. It happens to more people than you think. Talk to your friends. Talk to your family.

 

If you could describe the play in three words, what would they be?

Witty. Ballsy. Fun.

 

SAFIYYA INGAR

SAFIYYA INGAR

What are you most excited about?  

I think it's the idea of going to a new part of the UK every day, obviously will be great to see the sights but having to adapt to new spaces with new teams, a new audience and fresh perspectives every day. As a first gig it's pretty amazing! Also the on-the-road doughnuts and banter... and all the Lochs! Never seen a Loch before!  

 

Who/what did you use as inspiration to get into the character?

As I'm playing several characters, 8 to be exact, who pop out in quick succession and we only experience them for a brief amount of time, where they sit in the story of Tobes life is crucial as the relationships he has with the characters we meet is in some way a turning point for him. I guess I first used small personality traits of people I know that have the same relationship to Tobes as they do to me and applied it as a basic template. We then used a bunch of techniques to do with individual rhythms that people subconsciously possess that physically manifest to use as another detail to make a choice that helps distinguish each character from another and how they relate to Tobes. We got it into our bodies and work from there. We have quite a bit of music inspiration in this piece so blasting a bit of 'The Vaccines' really gets us all into it!  

 

If you were to convince a first time theatre goer to watch this show how would you describe it to them?

It's so funny and completely accessible, I know that sounds insanely formal but it is! It's not a lecture. Its about awareness and a serious topic that goes unspoken. It's a true story and not like a movies lame definition of "based on a true story".. it literally is! But you will be howling at points! We we're in fits of laughter in rehearsals and we hope we can do the same for you guys while helping you all to understand that it's ok to talk about stuff and be embarrassed and unafraid of being judged. Always create a dialogue. It'd be great if you joined us for that!

 

What have you learnt from this production and what you say to your younger self when it comes to broaching the subject of testicular cancer?

I learn new things every day about this topic and the task we've been given. I don't think I ever spoke to any of my friends about testicular cancer and majority of my friendship group are male. And I actually found out that someone close to me had a family member experience the exact same thing that Tobes does and he didn't even tell me until he knew I was in this play... That's kind of scary.. It's part of this culture that makes men think that they can't be open about this topic.. That women will be judgemental and laugh at them- Not true. That people will think you're weak- Not true. That your image is more important than your health, your mental health and physical health - definitely not true! Strip away this idea of thinking there is something to lose if you're honest with people, not even with just talking about your body but talking about all the feelings that go with it. That's all part of you!

 

I guess I'd just tell myself to be aware of it and don't be such an insensitive moron about it. We say this play is funny which it is. But I guess for a while I went around saying it was a comedy but I realize it isn't at heart, there are definitely hilarious moments as there would be when you're experiencing life with another person but this isn't a topic that can be swept underneath the jokes. It's all real and it hurts someone somewhere every single day.

 

If you could describe the play in three words, what would they be?

Fast, hilarious, warming.

 

DOMINIC JONES

DOMINIC JONES

What are you most excited about?

Seeing how different audiences react to the story from place to place. What some audiences will find really funny, others might not. It will be exciting for it to keep changing not get comfortable with it.     

    

Who/what did you use as inspiration to get into the character?

Some aspects Jesse from Breaking Bad kind of struck me in terms of a guy trying his best whilst bad things seem to follow him around (from his perspective anyway). Mostly drawing on my own experiences was really helpful in locating that sort of dread that Tobes goes through.     

    

If you were to convince a first time theatre goer to watch this show how would you describe it to them?

It deals with something really serious with so much warmth and humour. It'll feel really accessible and unpretentious with how it treats the audience.     

    

What have you learnt from this production and what you say to your younger self when it comes to broaching the subject of testicular cancer?

The main thing I would take would be that it is only as hard as you make it in terms of talking about it. It feels like it only takes one person to be up front about it and everyone else follows that openness.     

    

If you could describe the play in three words, what would they be?

Relentless, hilarious, brutal.